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LASIK and Corneal Scars

A corneal scar is an injury to your eye’s cornea. Having a corneal scar doesn’t necessarily disqualify you from LASIK eye surgery, but certain types of scars can have a negative effect on the results of surgery. You ophthalmologist should carefully examine your corneal scar to consider the following factors:

  • The depth of the scar – If your scar is superficial, it is possible to remove it during LASIK surgery. A deeper scar can be reduced and improved with a different laser treatment (such as PRK), but it still might not be completely eliminated.
  • The location of the scar – Unless your scar is close to the center of your eye, you are probably still a candidate for LASIK. However, if it is too close to your visual axis and has an effect on your vision, your ophthalmologist may recommend an alternative laser treatment.
  • The cause of the scar – If the scar was the result of an infection, the exact type of infection may affect your LASIK candidacy. For example, if viral keratitis caused your scar, there is a slight risk that LASIK surgery would re-activate the virus.

LASIK surgery should only be performed on patients who are ideal candidates. In some situations, corneal scars can be reduced or eliminated by Laser Vision Correction. But if your ophthalmologist believes your corneal scar would pose an undue risk, he or she can work with you to find an alternative solution.

If you would like more information about LASIK and scarred eyes, contact an experienced LASIK eye surgeon in your area today.

This entry was posted on Thursday, September 29th, 2011 at 7:25 pm and is filed under Eye Anatomy, Eye Safety, Eye Surgery. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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